© 2018 by Matt Via. 

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Frequently Asked Questions

Why do my trees/shrubs need to be pruned?

Your trees & shrubs are an investment.  Like most investments, they need to be well taken care of to increase in value.  Plants care about making seeds and creating offspring.  They do not care how attractive they look or whether they live a long time.  Proper pruning with horticultural knowledge and an artistic eye can make and keep your woody plants healthy and aesthtically pleasing.

When should my plants be pruned?

That depends on what you have.  As a general rule, anything that flowers in the summer should be pruned in the winter (late Jan until early/mid Mar) and/or in the summer, just after flowering.  Spring flowering species should be pruned in the spring, immediately after flowering.  The timing of evergreen species varies.

How often should I have my trees pruned?  

Once or twice per year.  If rejuvenation of old, neglected plants is in order, there may be a need for a couple of years of fairly heavy pruning.  The first year or two require the most time and effort and subsequent years are about maintaining the progress made and making minor adjustments for aesthetics.  

Can you cut down my tall maple tree next to my house?

No.  I am fully insured for pruning work, but i am not covered for large tree removal or stump grinding.  Furthermore I don't own or operate a chainsaw.  My business and my skill set is focused on improving and keeping alive shrubs and small to medium sized trees.  Please hire an insured arborist to perform your tree removal.

I don't like how tall my Japanese Maple tree is, can you make it shorter?

Unfortunately, not by much.  There are some rare occasions where I can bring down the height of a tree without compromising it's health, but for the most part, if a tree is too tall for a particular area, the best solution is to remove it and plant a species that is appropriately sized for the location.  To drastically reduce the height of a tree, one must employ a technique called "topping," which destroys a tree's health and form permanently. This is not a technique I would ever use.